In many ways after the earthquake, the dust settled.

The emergency medical cases were treated.  The dead were mourned.   The relief supplies were brought in and distributed.

But in many ways, the dust hasn’t settled.    I’m not talking about the physical dust – though there is still a lot of that…..

I’m talking about the emotional and relational dust.   Estimates vary from under 100,000 to over 300,000 people died on January 12, 2010.    No matter what the number, there are a lot of emotional scars from that kind of loss.    A lot of people lost loved ones – fathers, mothers, sisters, brothers, sons, daughters, gone with the shake of the land.

A lot of people lost their source of support – their primary wage earner is no longer there and that hurts – both financially and physically and also emotionally.

Those who did survive did so through a traumatic and life altering time and experience.    An experience that will leave them  changed forever.

Anyone who knows anything about Post Traumatic Stress (PTSD) knows that surviving and living in Haiti during those traumatic first months after the quake (let alone the first days) makes one a prime candidate for PTSD.

The dust has settled – but the dust is still being felt in many ways.

I get a lot of people asking me how Haiti is doing at rebuilding – my standard answer is that it is – but compared to the pace at which the U.S. is rebuilding from Katrina, it’s a slow motion movie……..