That’s a question that churches don’t ask often enough.

So What?

Jesus suffered under Pontius Pilate – so what?

The Israelites ate manna for 40 years – so what?

Joseph was a victim of human trafficking – so what?

Peter looked down and fell into the water – so what?

Jesus ate dinner at a short IRS agent’s house – so what?

Jesus said, “Today you will be with me in paradise” – so what?

Jonah ran that way – so what?

Noah built a big boat – so what?

Elijah had a bout of depression with suicidal tendencies – so what?

Eve said to Adam – here, eat this apple – so what?

Joshua and Caleb hid on the roof of a prostitute’s house – so what?

Esther became queen in a foreign land – so what?

Daniel only ate veggies and water – so what?

Ruth stayed with her mother – in – law – so what?

So many things happened in the 66 books of the Bible.    So many stories are told, so many questions are answered.

But we don’t address this question nearly enough.   “So What?”

So what does it mean to me?

So what impact will that have on my life?

So what does original sin mean for me?

So what does the story of Ruth mean for today?

So what impact does Joseph’s faith have in my life?

These are not JUST stories from a long long time ago.    They are stories that God has chosen to preserve for history.

And the church needs to address the issues that these stories bring up, these Biblical, God chosen stories, and focus on them in a way that asks “So What?”

So what does it mean for our church?

So how can we reach more people for Christ because of what we’ve learned about Noah?

So how can we be more like  Elijah?

Many people say that the church needs to be more culturally relevant.   That’s not what I’m talking about here.   What I’m talking about here is pretty simple and straightforward.

The church needs to take the stories of the Bible and use them to equip and sustain the church members so they can live more like God wants them (us) to.

And we can do that by answering the question, “So what?”

Why does it matter?

Tom