Well, thank you for that, Captain Obvious…..

Bear with me on this.   Words mean things.   And the same words don’t mean the same things to all people.   Let me give you some examples……

Economic privilege vs. white privilege.   Let’s take Colin Kapernick as an example.   Colin grew up as an adopted bi-racial son of an upper middle class (maybe even upper, I don’t know) white family.   There have been pictures of his family floating around the internet and they are all definitely white people – except for Colin.

Many people are complaining about Colin’s protests.   In those complaints, the general theme seems to be (generalization – not everyone) that because Colin grew up in an upper middle class white family and is making millions of dollars playing a game, he has no right to protest.   After all, he’s taken advantage of the system he’s protesting, hasn’t he?

That’s where the difference comes in – yes, Colin has taken advantage of the economic privileges that come his way.   That’s not what he’s protesting.   He’s protesting the fact that many black people in the United States are not being treated fairly and are not being given the opportunities to succeed and are being abused by the police.   He’s not protesting economic privilege, he’s protesting white privilege and a LACK of black privilege.

For those who disagree with Mr. Kapernick, keep in mind that just as you have the right to protest against what he’s saying, you have to give Mr. Kapernick the right and the privilege to protest as he sees fit.   Freedom of speech works both ways.

Protesting against a national anthem vs. insulting the military who defend our country and keep us safe.   There’s another example of where words mean things.   Mr. Kapernick and others are protesting the National Anthem because they don’t believe that the government and society that it represents  treats black people as equals to white people. 

But if anyone has found a place where Mr. K has insulted the military or said anything derogatory about the men and women who defend our country, I’d like to know where you found that.   It is possible to protest against certain practices in our government and certain social consequences that remain from the past and still support the military who keeps our America safe.

I see and hear a lot of confusion about these words – white privilege, economic privilege, protest, disloyal to military, First Amendment.   I’d like to end this hopefully clarifying a few things…..

America is a great place – the reason we have to have discussions and conversations about immigration is because people want to live here.

America is not a perfect place – whether you choose to look at economics, racism, poverty, drugs, Congress, there are many places where it is obvious that this country has many things screwed up.

While I don’t like either of the main party political candidates, they both have the right to say what they want.   And so do I.   And so does Colin Kapernick.

Protesting against problems in this country doesn’t mean you don’t love this country any more than reprimanding a misbehaving teenager means you’re going to kick him out of the family home.

The problem with the “All Lives Matter” movement is that not all lives matter the same in the United States of America……

  • Not all black lives matter as much as white lives do.
  • Aborted lives, aborted babies don’t matter.

We have a problem in our country.   That problem has been a bit “under the radar” for most of us for a while.    It’s not any more.   Now it’s front and center.

We don’t treat all of us the same.   Until we do, we need to be open to the protests of others and realize they have the right to their opinions.

Just as you have the right to yours.

And so does Colin.

TJV