The Church and Donald Trump

The following is a quote from an article in Politico magazine. In it, they summarize some things but they also quote the current President a number of times.

On Tuesday, President Donald Trump refused to condemn white supremacists. On Wednesday, he blamed suburban, low-income people of color for “ruining this American dream.”  The comments represent a feature — not a bug — of Trump’s presidency and campaign that are ramping up in the final month of the election.
A day after he told the far-right Proud Boys, to “stand by,” igniting outrage from Democrats and concern from Republicans, the president equated having a low income to being a minority. He also claimed — falsely — that Joe Biden wants to turn Minnesota into a refugee state.
Speaking to a mostly white crowd in Duluth, Minn., on Wednesday, Trump gave a shout-out to the suburbs, particularly “women in the suburbs.” He boasted he was the person to end an Obama-era fair housing rule, which he said brought “low-income housing” to suburbia.
“By the way, just so we can get this straight, 30 percent of the people in the suburbs are low-income people. Thirty percent of the people in the suburbs are minorities. And so we’re ruining this American dream for everybody,” Trump said.” From the Politico News

Can someone do me a favor?

Answer this question – “As a Christian, meaning you believe in Jesus, and you believe that what the Bible says is true, can you please explain to me how that works?

How does what Donald Trump does and says line up with the Bible calls Christians to do and to believe in and to support?

I’m not talking about the stuff he did and said in the 2016 campaign or the way that he verbally abused people (one handicapped reporter comes to mind). I’m not talking about those, I’m talking about the last couple of weeks.

If you feel you can answer that question in a calm well thought thorough manner and would like to share it with me and the rest of my readers, write it up and send it to me. But a couple of guidelines:
1. No name calling or blaming anyone else for anything (no words that I have to blank out either.) This has to be about you and Donald Trump. Why can you, a professing believer in Jesus Christ support him for president.
2. If it’s going to be more than 500 words, it needs to be split into parts so that each piece is no more than 500 words (give or take 20).
3. No using the term, “if only” or “but when” or “he tried” or “the Democrats wouldn’t allow him.” I don’t want you to make excuses for “the Donald.” I think that after four years, we pretty much know what we’re getting with (though it might be worse than we think based on hints dropped lately).
4. Pretty much what I’m asking for is for someone to attempt to explain to me how a Christian can vote for another 4 years and can at the same time acknowledge the ways that he has violated what God tells us in the Bible.

If anyone would like to take a stab at answering that, I would be happy to share my relatively small stage with you.

I will report back with brief updates if anyone says they are putting one together or anything like that. My hope is that all of us, Christians, non-Christians, Jews, Muslims, Hindus, and any other religious groups out there look at their beliefs and attempt to match it with our current president’s behaviors.

I look forward to seeing your thoughts and I will share mine once there has been ample time for others to share there.

Sincerely,

Tom

Words Mean Things

Well, thank you for that, Captain Obvious…..

Bear with me on this.   Words mean things.   And the same words don’t mean the same things to all people.   Let me give you some examples……

Economic privilege vs. white privilege.   Let’s take Colin Kapernick as an example.   Colin grew up as an adopted bi-racial son of an upper middle class (maybe even upper, I don’t know) white family.   There have been pictures of his family floating around the internet and they are all definitely white people – except for Colin.

Many people are complaining about Colin’s protests.   In those complaints, the general theme seems to be (generalization – not everyone) that because Colin grew up in an upper middle class white family and is making millions of dollars playing a game, he has no right to protest.   After all, he’s taken advantage of the system he’s protesting, hasn’t he?

That’s where the difference comes in – yes, Colin has taken advantage of the economic privileges that come his way.   That’s not what he’s protesting.   He’s protesting the fact that many black people in the United States are not being treated fairly and are not being given the opportunities to succeed and are being abused by the police.   He’s not protesting economic privilege, he’s protesting white privilege and a LACK of black privilege.

For those who disagree with Mr. Kapernick, keep in mind that just as you have the right to protest against what he’s saying, you have to give Mr. Kapernick the right and the privilege to protest as he sees fit.   Freedom of speech works both ways.

Protesting against a national anthem vs. insulting the military who defend our country and keep us safe.   There’s another example of where words mean things.   Mr. Kapernick and others are protesting the National Anthem because they don’t believe that the government and society that it represents  treats black people as equals to white people. 

But if anyone has found a place where Mr. K has insulted the military or said anything derogatory about the men and women who defend our country, I’d like to know where you found that.   It is possible to protest against certain practices in our government and certain social consequences that remain from the past and still support the military who keeps our America safe.

I see and hear a lot of confusion about these words – white privilege, economic privilege, protest, disloyal to military, First Amendment.   I’d like to end this hopefully clarifying a few things…..

America is a great place – the reason we have to have discussions and conversations about immigration is because people want to live here.

America is not a perfect place – whether you choose to look at economics, racism, poverty, drugs, Congress, there are many places where it is obvious that this country has many things screwed up.

While I don’t like either of the main party political candidates, they both have the right to say what they want.   And so do I.   And so does Colin Kapernick.

Protesting against problems in this country doesn’t mean you don’t love this country any more than reprimanding a misbehaving teenager means you’re going to kick him out of the family home.

The problem with the “All Lives Matter” movement is that not all lives matter the same in the United States of America……

  • Not all black lives matter as much as white lives do.
  • Aborted lives, aborted babies don’t matter.

We have a problem in our country.   That problem has been a bit “under the radar” for most of us for a while.    It’s not any more.   Now it’s front and center.

We don’t treat all of us the same.   Until we do, we need to be open to the protests of others and realize they have the right to their opinions.

Just as you have the right to yours.

And so does Colin.

TJV

Think it Doesn’t Happen Here?

The names and locations have been changed to protect privacy…….

So, in a suburb of one of the 100 largest cities in the United States, a dad took his kids to the library.

No big deal right?

Dad is white.

Kids are black.  Adopted.  Teenagers.

“Dad, I can’t find my library card!”

“We don’t have a lot of time, we’ll just put them on my library card, okay?”

A bit later…..

“Dad, I’ve got my books…..”

“Okay, let’s go check out and go home and grill hamburgers for supper, sound good?”

“Can I help who’s next?”

“I’d like to check out these books but I can’t find my card so I’m going to put them on my dad’s card.”

Dad puts library card on the counter.

Looking at Dad, library clerk says, “Does he have his card number?”  (He – teenage son – is 2 feet away)

Dad looks at son, “Do you know the number?”  “No.”

“Does he know what happened to the card?”  Once again he is 2 feet away.

Dad – “Not sure, can you look it up with my license, I’m on his card?   Otherwise just put them on mine.”

Clerk – “I’ll look it up.”

Tick tock, a couple of minutes pass.

Clerk – “I can’t find his record, are you okay with putting his books on your account?”  

Dad – “Yes I am.”

So, ask yourself, what happened here?

It seems to me that there’s one of two possible explanations for the clerk choosing to speak to the Dad and ignore the black teenage son even though they were the son’s books and he was standing right there:

The clerk is uncomfortable talking to teenagers.   If that is true, then the clerk shouldn’t be employed in a position where she has to talk to kids and teenagers.

The clerk is uncomfortable talking to black teenage boys.  She wouldn’t look at the son, she wouldn’t talk to the son and he was standing right there.

The black son wasn’t in danger, wasn’t acting out, he was just being a typical tired teenager.  The Caucasian library clerk obviously felt very uncomfortable and didn’t want to talk to him.

Think it doesn’t happen here?

Think again.

TJV